Residents of Inglis House enjoy a picnic lunch one way the dining department tries to encourage communal activity and provide monotony breakers for the facility39s wheelchairbound patients

Residents of Inglis House enjoy a picnic lunch, one way the dining department tries to encourage communal activity and provide monotony breakers for the facility's wheelchair-bound patients.

Making Group Dining Attractive for Wheelchair Bound Patients

Inglis House, a residential facility for para- and quadriplegic residents, poses unique challenges for its dining services.

Inglis House in downtown Philadelphia supports nearly 300 residents, all in wheelchairs due to severe neurodegenerative physical disabilities resulting in paraplegia and quadriplegia. Naturally, dining in such a facility requires a specialized approach as the majority of the residents cannot feed themselves without assistance.

Beyond that is the psychological factor of being debilitated, which affects how residents approach dining. And that is why Inglis House has embarked on a major

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